How Many Events Are In The Special Olympics

 

How Many Events Are In The Special Olympics

As an athlete, you hear the word charity thrown around all the time. It’s important to give back to your community and to help others in need, but that doesn’t mean it has to be hard work! In fact, some of the biggest sports stars in the world have made an effort to use their fame and success to support causes they care about, whether it’s raising money for cancer research or helping children who are physically challenged participate in recreational sports and games. Check out these ten awesome sports stars who are also incredible humanitarians!

Tennis

If you're having trouble falling asleep, try doing some physical activity before bed. A study found that exercising in the late afternoon and evening helps people sleep better because it lowers body temperature and reduces muscle tension, which promotes restful sleep. Yoga and walking are two low-impact exercises you can do even if you have insomnia—it doesn't matter if you exercise for 30 minutes or more; just be sure to leave yourself plenty of time to unwind before turning in for bed. Consider your routine: Aim for physical activity three days a week but not on evenings when you want to be alert. Work with what fits best into your schedule; for instance, if mornings are hectic at home with everyone getting ready for school or work, plan an evening walk instead.

Judo

It’s not that your body needs more time to process food or you’re filling it with worse stuff. It just takes longer for your muscles, bones, and everything else in your body (that isn’t skeletal) to be able to use all of that energy as effectively as they could. So, when you want to get a good night’s sleep after eating too much, it can take a while for all of those extra calories and fats to burn off.

Athletics

Exercise is a double-edged sword. On one hand, exercise is incredible for keeping your body (and mind) healthy, but on the other hand it can disrupt your circadian rhythm and ruin precious hours of sleep. If you're struggling with insomnia and want to work out during daytime hours, start slowly. It might seem like common sense to exercise early in the morning so you have time for rest later on, but that can actually be even more disruptive to your sleep schedule! Instead, build up your endurance and wait until about two hours before bedtime when melatonin levels are at their highest . Start with low-intensity exercise like walking or stretching.

Basketball

There’s no doubt that many of us toss and turn throughout the night, but is it normal? Is there anything we can do about it? As it turns out, yes. In fact, one recent study found that a series of shots taken from a three-point range may actually help you sleep better at night. Here’s how: The act of shooting those basketballs releases endorphins—the feel-good chemicals in your brain—and also helps reduce muscle tension.

Football

Rather than getting frustrated when you can’t fall asleep, try doing what you would do if you had some huge game tomorrow: set an alarm for an hour before bedtime and spend that time prepping for sleep. Put on your pajamas, turn off any screens (including phone, tablet, and computer), or at least put them on airplane mode so they won’t emit blue light, and head to bed.

Swimming

Make your bedroom like an aquarium. Blackout shades and heavy curtains will help block out any light, which is crucial for getting a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that it takes about 15 minutes for our brains to realize we are in darkness and start producing melatonin, one of our body’s natural sleep-inducing hormones.

Weightlifting

The key to getting good sleep is losing fat and gaining muscle, since lean muscle mass produces human growth hormone (HGH), which boosts both your mental focus and physical recovery. In addition, HGH releases more energy for you throughout your day—which means you won’t be as tired as before. Make sure that you're eating enough calories at breakfast and lunchtime so that you don't feel too hungry in late afternoon or early evening; remember, all calories count!

Table Tennis

You may not be aware of it, but every evening you have an epic showdown with your brain. The match starts around 10 p.m., and you better believe it lasts through all hours of the night until you wake up for work again. If your brain wins, you'll toss and turn all night long because it thinks you're out hunting or gathering food instead of relaxing in your bed. If your brain is beaten, though, then at last you can get eight hours of good sleep and wake up refreshed!

Sailing

According to Dr. Tei-Fu Chen, author of Mastering Longevity, during sleep, our mind and body repair themselves from wear and tear experienced during waking hours. The deeper we sleep, the more restorative (and longer-lasting) that rest is. When it comes to inducing deep sleep, experts recommend going with 60 minutes of gentle exercise like yoga or tai chi prior to bedtime—exercises that promote both strength and flexibility in your muscles are also known for their relaxing qualities.

Cycling

Getting good sleep is crucial to overall health, and so is maintaining a consistent sleep schedule. Light therapy can help regulate our circadian rhythms (natural rhythms that dictate when we feel awake and alert). Cycling through bright light in the morning and dim light in the evening will keep your body’s natural wake/sleep patterns on track. Although it may be hard at first, try setting your alarm 15 minutes earlier each day until you’re waking up 30 minutes earlier than usual.